Feeds

Mexican students adopt robobabies

Computerised deterrent to teen pregnancies

The Power of One Infographic

The Mexican state of Chihuahua has formulated a cunning plan to reduce the area's soaring teenage birth rate - obliging youngsters to look after wailing, burping robobabies, Reuters reports.

Pairs of high school students aged between 13 and 17 adopt the computerised "RealCare babies" for two or three days, during which they are subjected to an authentic regime of babycare.

State education official Pilar Huidobro, who runs the scheme, explained: "You have to change their diapers, feed them and slap them on the back so they burp. They laugh, they get colic. They simulate the behaviour of a real baby."

She added: "The aim is to have a more novel way of getting young people to be really conscious of the risk of becoming fathers or mothers at a young age."

Chihuahua apparently boasts "one of the highest rates of teenage pregnancy in the country, with 20 per cent of babies being born to mothers aged 19 or younger", according to Huidobro.

The scheme appears to be working, though, with most participants described as "mostly horrified at the amount of work involved in looking after a baby". Huidobro reported: "There's been a good response. They all agree it's not the right time for that kind of responsibility." ®

Bootnote

In case you're thinking it would be pretty simple to leave your RealCare baby at home and push off down the cantina for a few tequilas, think again. It boasts a "easy-to-use wireless control unit" which "reports even more data than before, making grading easier and more accurate". These reports include "proper care percentage, missed care events, exact time and date of mishandled events, along with total cry time for the simulation".

Crikey. There's more tech specs for the RealCare baby here.

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 claimed lives of HIV/AIDS cure scientists
Researchers, advocates, health workers among those on shot-down plane
Forty-five years ago: FOOTPRINTS FOUND ON MOON
NASA won't be back any time soon, sadly
The Sun took a day off last week and made NO sunspots
Someone needs to get that lazy star cooking again before things get cold around here
Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Eccentric billionaire Musk gets his PRIVATE SPACEPORT
In the Lone Star State, perhaps appropriately enough
MARS NEEDS OCEANS to support life - and so do exoplanets
Just being in the Goldilocks zone doesn't mean there'll be anyone to eat the porridge
Diary note: Pluto's close-up is a year from … now!
New Horizons is less than a year from the dwarf planet
Boffins discuss AI space program at hush-hush IARPA confab
IBM, MIT, plenty of others invited to fill Uncle Sam's spy toolchest, but where's Google?
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.