Feeds

Europe beams out UWB roadmap

Agrees on the need for harmonisation

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The European Commission has taken the first steps towards an EU-wide license for Ultra Wide Band (UWB) radio communications, by agreeing that such an approach is necessary and laying down the basic pattern of adoption.

UWB has enormous potential as a cable-replacement technology. It offers huge amounts of bandwidth over very short ranges, making it ideal for shifting video around or connecting devices such as speakers to home audio equipment.

The EU recognises the potential and understands the importance of a harmonised market to economies of scale and drive down costs.

As predicted by the Wireless USB consortium, it is concern about grey imports that's driving the commission "with the aim of avoiding the otherwise expected massive proliferation of equipment imported from the US or Asia and put into service illegally [which] would ultimately risk a de facto acceptance of non-European rules which might not protect other radio users in Europe".

The agreement lays down some restrictions on device capabilities, including an assumption that most UWB equipment will be for indoor use (walls seriously restrict UWB propagation, and thus reduce potential interference) and will shut down transmissions after 10 seconds without acknowledgement.

Eventually, UWB is expected to shift to above 6GHz where it will have more room to breathe, but until 2011 the use of 4.2 to 4.8GHz without mitigation techniques (to detect and avoid interfering with other sources) will be allowed.

The Wireless USB consortium expects host devices, such as PCs or TVs, to be able to operate at any of the available frequencies with devices like cameras and video servers being regionally restricted depending on local laws.

The decision document also makes much of the unknown nature of UWB interference, and the importance of flexible regulation to allow for developments in technology and techniques, as well as responding to unforeseen interference issues. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
YOU are the threat: True confessions of real-life sysadmins
Who will save the systems from the men and women who save the systems from you?
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up
Turning it off and on again fixes glitch 12 HOURS LATER
Ofcom snatches 700MHz off digital telly, hands it to mobile data providers
Hungry mobe'n'slab-waving Blighty swallows spectrum
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Managing SSL certificates with ease
The lack of operational efficiencies and compliance pitfalls associated with poor SSL certificate management, and how the right SSL certificate management tool can help.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.