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Canadian geeks snub Sun's McNealy

Would prefer a RIM job

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For Sun Microsystems Chairman Scott McNealy, it could be the ultimate disgrace. A group of Canadian technophiles has organized a Geeks on Ice hockey tournament and not invited the technology world's most famous puck-hunting executive. Instead, the Geeks on Ice crew have tried to convince RIM CEO Jim Balsillie to attend their gig, and Balsillie has returned the favor by ignoring the Canucks.

McNealy has long been known as the most avid hockey fan in the IT kingdom. He grew up watching the Detroit Red Wings and now has season tickets to the San Jose Sharks games where he sits a row back from the glass. McNealy also plays on amateur hockey teams and has Sun put up ads at various hockey rinks around North America. [You can read all about McNealy's hockey exploits here.]

But the Geeks on Ice care less for McNealy's stature as perhaps the best big company hockey player and golfer. Instead, they are after Balsillie, a fellow Canadian who tried last year to buy the Pittsburgh Penguins.

The so-called Geeks on Ice have initiated an a "Draft Jim from RIM" letter writing campaign, hoping to convince the executive to attend their April 19-22, 16-team tournament in New Brunswick.

They figured that bombarding Balsillie with junk mail would be the best means of informing him about their tournament. With any luck, he will show up and draw attention to the plight of Canadian IT administrators.

"My personal goal is essentially to help change peoples' perceptions about IT in Atlantic Canada," Trevor Macausland, a Geeks on Ice co-founder, told the Telegraph Journal.

[On a related note, Java creator, Sun employee and Canadian James Gosling this week has been appointed to the Order of Canada.]

Why not just spam Balsillie on his BlackBerry or get him going on a 419 scam?

As you might expect, Balsillie has yet to respond to the letter writing effort. Maybe McNealy will answer the uncall. ®

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