Feeds

Microsoft probes new Office vulnerability

No end in sight

Security for virtualized datacentres

Just when the world thought it was safe to resume use of Microsoft Office, there's word that a new zero-day attack may be targeting the popular productivity package. Like so many of the others, it's capable of all kinds of mischief, including the execution of malicious code on a victim's machine.

It's been a busy few months for the boys and girls who plug the holes in the Microsoft Office dike. It was only Tuesday that they patched six Office holes that already were being exploited in the wild. Now they're investigating reports of a new critical vulnerability in the 2000 and XP versions of Office.

Security researchers have speculated that the days just following Microsoft's Patch Tuesday provide an opportune Window for cybercrooks to introduce new exploits. The software company is hesitant to issue patches outside its normal schedule, ensuring that these attacks have a longer shelf life, the reasoning goes. This latest Office exploit appears to support this theory.

As usual, a person would have to open a specially rigged Office document to fall victim to this latest attack. The company says users shouldn't open documents whose origins are unknown. Oh, and don't brush your teeth with a brick. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.