Feeds

Mobile anti-radiation - a telecoms 'inflight life-jacket'?

It's better to be safe than sorry

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

If that employee takes you to court, alleging that you were aware of possible deleterious effects but decided to ignore them, and that you were aware of possible safety measures but decided to avoid spending the money required to put them in place, you may well find (in American courts, particularly) that it will cost you more to defend the case than to settle.

If, however, you can stand up in court, and say: "Your Honour, we investigated this matter, and we have all this evidence to show that the risk could be eliminated by installing this device, and we have taken the best steps available to us to mitigate the harm," then you are probably in a pretty good position.

And you have all this evidence because Jim Lawler has collected it all together in his pitch. "Man made EMFs ihibit the cell's ability to repair strand breaks in DNA molecules. Strand breaks occur all the time, but man made EMFs inhibit healing," he says, quoting a Comet Tail assay, Lai and Singh, of the University of Washington in 2000. He has photographs of DNA strands breaking, and photographs of the same strands healing.

And Exradia isn't asking a huge price. To take advantage of its protection all you need to do is fit one of its chips to the phone battery. And if you don't want to do that, it'll sell you a spare battery for a very reasonable price. There's really no reason, in fact, why you shouldn't buy your phone batteries from Exradia anyway - the cost is pretty much the same as the originals.

Perhaps, phone makers may think the same way. If they source their batteries from Exradia or at least fit their batteries with Exradia chips, the incremental cost would be trivial - and they'll be able to use the Exradia Wi-Guard logo.

And anyway, if there is a Wi-Guard logo, perhaps it will stop people who know nothing at all about wireless and radiation from fretting, and actually improve their health?

I went to the Exradia presentation here in Barcelona expecting to have a good laugh. I came away pretty sure that I wouldn't bet large sums of my own money against Jim Lawler and his Wi-Guard.

Copyright © Newswireless.net

Related link

Exradia press release

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Mighty Blighty broadbanders beg: Let us lay cable in BT's, er, ducts
Complain to Ofcom that telco has 'effective monopoly'
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?