Feeds

Consumer demand will drive UWB regulation

The revolution is in your hands

Build a business case: developing custom apps

3GSM The European regulatory confusion surrounding Ultra Wide Band, and thus Wireless USB, will be solved by pressure from consumers once they see what the Americans, Chinese and Japanese can do with the technology, members of the consortium said today.

Wireless USB offers high-speed connections over short range, fast enough to run a second monitor or stream video around a house. But Ultra Wide Band, the technology on which Wireless USB is based, is completely different from the pick-a-frequency-and-stick-within-it mechanism currently used for wireless communications, and thus requires completely new regulation.

The USA has adopted a relaxed attitude to the technology allowing various flavours to be used freely, and the first Wireless USB kit is already available there. China and Japan look to be following suit, with more restrictions than the Americans but still managing early regulation.

ESTI, the body responsible for setting the regulations for Europe is still in discussions, and distinct differences exist between the member countries. It's hoped that the TG3 workgroup, who are debating the standard within ETSI, will reach a conclusion later this year but otherwise a rush of consumer interest is expected to force their hand.

"Grey imports will force Europe to adopt standards, and very quickly", said Jim Lansford, chief technology of officer of Alereon; maker of Wireless USB equipment.

Just as the UK was forced to legalise in-car FM transmitters for connecting MP3 players, because so many people were already using them, so the Wireless USB group believe we'll all ship their stuff in from abroad unless we can legally buy it in Europe.®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.