Feeds

VeriSign builds $1bn internet security Titan

Thinks big

Seven Steps to Software Security

RSA Verisign will spend $1bn during the next three years beefing up its internet infrastructure following this week's high-profile root server attack.

Verisign, the company managing .com and .net addresses, today announced Project Titan will drastically increase its server and bandwidth capacity to offset attacks as millions of users and devices surge online.

Chief executive Stratton Sclavos told the RSA Conference in San Francisco the spend is necessary to "make sure we are ahead of the race, instead of the bad guys".

Titan will see Verisign increase capacity of its DNS servers from 400 billion queries per day to more than four trillion, and bandwidth will be ramped from 20Gbps to 200Gbps to provide added redundancy and ensure attackers can't take any single geographic region offline, according to Sclavos.

The upgrade comes in the wake of a sustained 12-hour attack on three of the 13 root servers that maintain the internet's backbone launched by zombie PCs. The attack initially targeted domains ending in .uk but then moved to .org. It is not believed that any Verisign systems were targeted during the attack.

Observers are scratching their heads over the significance of the attack. While it's agreed that users experienced minimal impact, the feeling is this could herald something bigger. Calling the attack "sophisticated yet simple", Sclavos warned RSA that this was a sign of things to come as the perpetrators were probably unaware of how easy it was to scale up their attack to hit more servers and geographic regions.

According to Sclavos, Titan will help future proof the web against more damaging denial of service attacks as more users come online. The company expects a 20-fold increase in internet use by 2010 with of 1.8bn users while cyber attacks will increase by 50 per cent each year for the next two years.

Sclavos, meanwhile, went on to criticize the security industry for failing to devise security technology that is simple enough for the average PC and internet user.

Echoing RSA speakers from earlier this week, Sclavos warned that lack of confidence among consumers in things like security, privacy and protection of their online details is damaging the internet's growth. It's calculated $2bn was not spent online during the holiday season while 32 million consumers are not engaging in online banking because of lingering security concerns.

"As an industry we have failed to deliver it [security]," Sclavos said. "It's been put to use in marginal terms. We have the technology [PKI, firewalls, tokens and intrusion protection]... yet consumers feel more vulnerable than they've ever felt and are less comfortable in what they are doing. We think it's time for an end-to-end solution for what's become an end-to-end problem." ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Attackers raid SWISS BANKS with DNS and malware bombs
'Retefe' trojan uses clever spin on old attacks to grant total control of bank accounts
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.