Feeds

Cisco lets slip NAC code to open source

Nick-NAC

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Cisco is to release the source code of its networks access control (NAC) client to the open source community.

This comes on the back of Cisco's security portfolio revamp, announced this week at the RSA conference in San Francisco. Cisco Trust Agent (CTA) software doesn't fit in with the new strategy, which places less emphasis on desktop clients and more on features like preventing confidential data from leaking. Hence the company's decision to turn over CTA's development to the open source community.

Network Admission Control technologies enforce security policy, for example enabling fully patched systems to access a network, while aiming to control malware outbreaks. The technology has network and desktop components.

Cisco now wants to focus on the network side of the equation. By ceasing development work on CTA, the network giant says it can devote more energy to other areas of network access control. Its decision follows an interoperability pact between Microsoft and Cisco, announced last September, designed to enforce security policies on Windows PCs and servers.

The two agreed to ensure Microsoft's Network Access Protection (NAP) and Cisco's Network Admission Control (NAC) systems worked together. Interoperability means customers can deploy Cisco's NAC and upgrade to Microsoft's NAP once Windows Longhorn Server ships later this year. Cisco Trust Agent does not figure in this revised roadmap.

"CTA will be something that's open source. That's just logically where it should end up," Bob Gleichauf, chief technology officer of Cisco's Security Technology Group, told InfoWorld. "We don't want to be in the CTA business, so we're going to just open it up." ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Turnbull: NBN won't turn your town into Silicon Valley
'People have been brainwashed to believe that their world will be changed forever if they get FTTP'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.