Feeds

Inclusiveness is new Oracle search word

Treading on IBM and Google toes

High performance access to file storage

Oracle is beefing up its enterprise search, by offering links to non-Oracle applications and data repositories. The idea is to make it a compete more creditably in this fieled against Google and IBM.

The database giant today unveils the snappily named Oracle Secure Enterprise Search 10g release 10.1.8, which is now capable of supporting data sources and object stores from at least five major third party providers. Oracle Enterprise Search 10g supports Microsoft Exchange and Sharepoint software, IBM's Lotus Notes, and enterprise content management systems from Open Text, FileNet and EMC Documentum.

Additionally, Oracle has launched the Secure Search Initiative to encourage independent software vendors to build more connectors to other third-parties' information sources, such as desktops and business intelligence software. Other changes include a virtual identity directory so Secure Enterprise Search is capable of working with users' existing ID servers including Microsoft's Active Directory, Novell eDirectory, Sun's Java System Directory Server, and OpenLDAP, without the need to port users' security information to Oracle.

Federated search is also included, so servers can be based locally and results consolidated to maximize search results without overloading servers or the network. A suggested links feature will throw up potential results users might want.

Out of the box

Secure Enterprise Search is set to grow in importance for Oracle. Currently available as a stand-alone search tool, Oracle is to make it available in all its applications. Secure Enterprise Search is already shipping out-of-the box as part of Siebel CRM 8, announced last week.

Oracle Enterprise Search indexes and searches public, private and shared content in websites, databases, file and mail servers, CMS and document repositories. It's secure because Oracle's identity management software stops users from accessing data sources and documents they are not allowed to view.

According to Oracle, its search combines the ease of use of an internet search engine that users have now come to expect from all their search tools, with the data and identity management rules that ensure users only get access to the information they are entitled to. By adding search to applications such as Siebel, Oracle expects help business users find and use corporate information.

Oracle has managed the unlikely feat of stepping on the toes of both IBM and Google with Secure Enterprise Search. Google's search appliances run between $2,000 and $30,000 and can trawl through more than 200 different file types, while IBM teamed up with Yahoo! in December with a free offering that combines enterprise and internet search. For full enterprise search, you fork out mucho dollars - $20,000 for an OminiFind Enterprise Edition connector license for 12 months, although the basic unit starts at $580. Both Google's $30,000 appliance and the IBM OmniFind Yahoo! edition are limited to searching 500,000 documents, though.

Oracle Enterprise Search also weighs in at $30,000 - only it's per CPU. But you get a handful of out-of-the box Oracle, Microsoft and FileNet connectors, and there's no limit to the number of documents searched. After that you're on your own, and you gotta pay for more connectors as you bring more sources online.

According to Gordon Cider, Oracle's senior director of product marketing, Oracle has IBM and Google beat on price, and beat with the product's ease-of-search coupled with security and integration with business applications.

"You see people take different approaches. You have people [IBM] who have a long history in enterprise search but don't have a very broad deployment - the biggest hurdle has been in the relative complexity of deployment. And you have people [Google] who offer simplified search but don't have the experience of dealing with complex enterprise data sources. We are trying to preserve simplicity without compromising on security.... We have a unique position in applications and have a large identity management practice," he said. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed
Windows 7 making some gains on XP Death Day
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
US taxman blows Win XP deadline, must now spend millions on custom support
Gov't IT likened to 'a Model T with a lot of things on top of it'
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.