Feeds

FTC sets Rambus DDR SDRAM royalty rate

After three years, fee falls to zero

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has told Rambus how much the memory technology developer may levy in royalties on SDRAM and DDR SDRAM devices for the next three years, after which the company may not charge any royalties at all. Rambus said it was "disappointed" with the ruling and stated its plan to appeal against the ruling.

The FTC's order marks the latest stage in its epic anti-trust action against Rambus, which it embarked upon in June 2002. Rambus revealed the FTC's order, which demands that the company charge no more than "0.25 per cent for SDRAM products; 0.5 per cent for DDR SDRAM products, SDRAM memory controllers or other non-memory chip components; and one per cent for DDR SDRAM memory controllers or other non-memory chip components".

The order, which unless challenged will come into force in 60 days' time does not extend to DDR 2 products. It won't come into force, of course, because Rambus will challenge the verdict. It said it will ask for the order to be suspended temporarily pending the outcome of its appeal against the ruling.

The FTC formally judged Rambus guilty of monopolising four key memory technologies in August 2006. It said the company had deceived standards-setting body Jedec "by fostering the belief that Rambus neither had, nor was seeking, relevant patents that would be enforced against Jedec-compliant products," the FTC wrote last year.

"Through its successful strategy, Rambus was able to conceal its patents and patent applications until after the standards were adopted and the market was locked in," the organisation said. "Only then did Rambus reveal its patents – through patent infringement lawsuits against Jedec members who practiced the standard."

All of which Rambus denies. Today, it pointed to the findings of FTC Chief Administrative Law Judge Stephen McGuire's three-month Spring 2003 investigation into the FTC allegations, which he later, in February 2004, dismissed in its entirety. However, the FTC's investigators appealed against the ruling and won the right to proceed against Rambus.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit
USB-serial imitators whacked by driver update
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
DOUBLE BONK: Testy fanbois catch Apple Pay picking pockets
Users wail as tapcash transactions are duplicated
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.