Feeds

150 ways to let hackers in

Shut that (code) door

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

To paraphrase Paul Simon, there are 150 ways to leave your software open to attack, according to Fortify Software, the Palo Alto-based security software specialist.

In the latest update to its Fortify Security Coding Rulepack, the company says it has added a further 34 "vulnerability categories", bringing the grand total to 150.

Fortify's philosophy is that the best place to deal with security threats is in source code when software is being built. Well-designed code can prevent a wide range of attacks and Fortify's Source Code Analysis tool helps improve code design and keep out the malcontents.

"Security threats are a constant challenge to programmers - but their priorities are to meet deadlines and deliver new features. We can help by giving them good tools to help make software less vulnerable," says Jacob West, manager of the security research group at Fortify.

According to Fortify, the two most-prevalent forms of attack are cross-site scripting, where rogue code pretends to be from a trusted site, and SQL injection, where executable SQL commands are put into data streams.

West says cross-site scripting can be prevented by using data flow analysis. "You can identify data as it comes in and check that it is what it says it is. A billing address, for example, should only contain letters and numbers. If it contains special characters then it may well be suspect."

Similarly, SQL injection may be avoided by ensuring that SQL data streams do not contain executable instructions. "SQL injection introduces extra commands into an SQL stream which can circumvent access control and enable data to be changed. If you can control the SQL command input you can do almost anything. But you can prevent it by input validation and restricting what you allow in commands."

The rulepacks are part of Fortify's Manager Security Control Centre. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?