Feeds

Intel next target as Opti sues Apple over CPUs?

Same patent infringement claim AMD faces

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Apple has become the latest target of technology holding company Opti, two months after AMD also found itself on the recieving end of an Opti lawsuit alleging infringement.

Opti's lawsuit, filed with the US District Court for Eastern Texas yesterday, claims Apple makes and sells products that incorporate its technology, enshrined in three US patents: 5,710,906, 5,813,036 and 6,405,291, all entitled "Predictive Snooping of Cache Memory for Master-Initiated Accesses". The first two patents were awarded in 1998, the third in 2002. The later patents represent continuations of the first one.

To date, Opti has focused on chip makers rather than those companies' customers, and a cynic might suggest the firm initiated its action only after reading about Apple's spectacular Q1 FY2007 results earlier this week.

While Apple has used AMD chips in the past - and may still do - for peripheral products, such as its AirPort Wi-Fi base-stations, the Opti suit refers to Apple's "desktop and portable computers and servers", all of which now contain Intel processors.

Has Intel been sued by Opti? Did it settle? Is another Opti lawsuit in the offing? We don't know, and we await with interest Intel's response to these questions.

AMD received its Opti lawsuit in November 2006, three months after Opti and Nvidia settled out of court, the conclusion of a complaint filed by Opti in October 2004. Nvidia will pay Opti $750,000 a quarter from February onwards for a three-year period, or simply cough up a one-off payment of $7m.

AMD is currently facing a separate claim that its 3DNow! technology violates patents held by MicroUnity. Apple is, of course, facing a trademark infringement claim from Cisco over the use of the word 'iPhone'. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Apple iPhone 6: Missing sapphire glass screen FAIL explained
They just cannae do it in time, says analyst
Half a BILLION in the making: Bungie's Destiny reviewed
It feels very familiar - but it's still good
Oh noes, fanbois! iPhone 6 Plus shipments 'DELAYED' in the UK
Is EMBIGGENED Apple mobile REALLY that popular?
Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT
Let's >sigh< see what Cupertino has been up to for the past year
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch
Sizes, prices and all – but not for the wrist-o-puter
Get your Indian Landfill Android One handsets - they're only SIXTY QUID
Cheap and deafening mobes for the subcontinental masses
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.