Feeds

ID theft fears over Hampshire hospital PC theft

Patient peril

High performance access to file storage

The theft of 30 computers containing patient details from a disused hospital site in Hampshire has sparked ID theft fears.

PCs, worth an estimated £15,000, were taken from a storeroom in the recently closed Lymington Infirmary earlier this month. The facility was shut to make way for a new £36m facility in the town.

Although the stolen computers are not believed to contain medical records, they may contain the names and addresses of patients and workers on the site. Health care administrators have begun an audit designed to determine exactly what information the PCs contained.

"Following the theft our technical experts have been reviewing what was stored on, and moved from, each computer's hard drive," a Hampshire Primary Care Trust spokeswoman told the Daily Mail.

"There were no complete medical records on the stolen machines. Our policy is that no information about individuals should be stored on the hard drives of computers," she added.

Hospital staff were advised not to store patient records on PCs in September 2006 via a memo containing guidance that was reissued in December 2006, shortly before the theft. The stolen PCs were pinched just before techies were due to check that they'd been wiped clean of potentially sensitive information.

The trust plans to make a decision about whether to inform individuals whose data was potentially exposed by the theft after completing its investigation about what data was on the machines.

The theft has been reported to Hampshire Police, which is investigating the case, the Daily Mail adds. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.