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AOpen readies Car PC for Mitsubishi motors

Voice-activated navigation, entertainment centre

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aopen car pc

Mini PC specialist AOpen today joined Mitsubishi to unveil a voice-controlled in-car computer designed to provide driver and passengers with travel information and keep them entertained - and connected - while they're out and about.

Called the Car PC, the unit's designed to slot into a range of vehicle Mitsubishi said it will bring to market in the US and China during 2007. The system incorporates a GPS receiver to provide navigation guidance, and AOpen said it will feature internet connectivity too, presumably through a built-in cellular link.

aopen car pc - image courtesy autonet.com.tw

The Car PC is based on an Intel Celeron M 360 and Intel's 915 chipset with built-in graphics, AOpen said. The device has a compact LCD screen and an optical drive for DVD and CD playback. The machine runs Windows, but AOpen has produced a custom front end that provides direct access to key entertainment and driver-information utilities. ®

aopen car pc

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