Feeds

You want a $100 computer? For $300? No sale!

No Laptop per Rich Child

Remote control for virtualized desktops

One Laptop per Child (OLPC), a non-profit organisation with the goal of providing children in developing nations with laptop computers, today announced that "contrary to previously published reports OLPC has no plans to make the XO laptops available for sale to the general public."

Sad news for Computerworld's Frank Hayes who says he wants one.

Exactly where the idea comes from that the things would be generally for sale, isn't clear. Well, nearly; it came from the Consumer Electronics Show, where Michalis Bletsas, chief connectivity officer for the project, was quoted saying that eBay could be a partner to sell the laptop. "If we started selling the laptop now, we would do very good business," Mr Bletsas, told BBC News.

The Bletsas interview was long and detailed, and it's hard to understand how it might be wrong. But yesterday, the OLPC project went to the trouble of putting out a denial. OLPC founder Nicholas Negroponte: "Contrary to recent reports, One Laptop per Child is not planning a consumer version of its current XO laptop, designed for the poorest and most remote children in the world."

He said that the XO "will be made available to governments in very large quantities to be given to all children free, as part of the education system."

The denial went on: "Many commercial ventures have been considered and proposed that may surface in 2008 or beyond, one of which is ‘buy 2 and get 1.’ In addition, OLPC is launching OLPC Foundation later this month, specifically to accommodate the huge goodwill and charity that has surfaced around the idea of a $100 laptop."

Which leaves Frank Hayes miffed: "Look, these machines. They're cute, colorful, rugged, and even at $300 each or more they'd be an inexpensive and very welcome addition to any long car trip with kids. Selling them to the general public would be a great way to raise extra money for the project, raise awareness of the project and generally feed the OLPC/XO machinery" he wrote.

Copyright © Newswireless.net

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
All aboard the Poo Bus! Ding ding, route Number Two departing
Only another three days of pooing and I can have a ride!
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Dragon Age Inquisition: Our chief weapons are...
Bioware's fantasy forces in fine fettle
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.