Feeds

SGI gives Microsoft the squeeze

Joins the crowd

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

SGI's rebirth won't be a Linux-only affair. The hardware maker today revealed plans to ship Microsoft's fancy cluster operating system with its servers.

Where the old SGI focused on selling high-end systems running its own Irix flavor of Unix and then later Linux, the new SGI will focus on selling just about anything to anyone who will buy it. The Windows Computer Cluster Server 2003 embrace backs that strategy with SGI moving well downstream in the high performance computing market. It expects true business customers – not just labs or specialty shops - to grab Microsoft's relatively new OS on Xeon-based Altix XE servers.

"The OEM agreement supports SGI's growth strategy in the enterprise, specifically targeting media data management; industrial design such as automotive and aerospace; healthcare; and government and academic markets where customers are often faced with mixed workflow infrastructures," SGI said.

The so-called "new SGI" recently emerged from bankruptcy after convincing its backers that it can turn a profit by pushing deeper into the corporate data center market. Such a run is necessary after sales to SGI's core high-end graphics customers started to dry up, with many firms opting to buy cheaper guy from rivals rather than forking out big bucks on SGI's pricey Linux on Itanium gear.

SGI, however, enters a very crowded field where the likes of IBM, HP, Dell and Sun Microsystems have more diverse and complete product lines.

On the Windows Computer Cluster Server front, SGI will need to catch up to HP and Dell – the most vocal backers of Microsoft's specialized OS. Luckily for SGI, Microsoft only managed to get a polished version of the "2003" OS shipped last year. That said, Microsoft already claims a number of large clusters running the software, which is meant to make basic server cluster functions easier to manage.

Linux is by far the dominant OS in the high performance computing market.

SGI plans to start shipping systems with the cluster OS in March at a starting price of $3,500. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.