Feeds

Jobs's Extreme Makeover plans for mansion rebuffed again

No, you can't knock it down

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Apple CEO Steve Jobs has suffered another setback in his five-year attempt to raze his 17,000-square-foot mansion so he can build something smaller.

Jobs, whose glowing image has been plastered on news outlets nonstop since Tuesday's keynote at Macworld in San Francisco, was told yesterday by a California state appeals court that he had failed to adequately show why it isn't practical to restore the house.

Jobs bought the Jackling House, located in the posh Silicon-Valley enclave of Woodside, in 1984. He lived in it for 10 years and then rented it out. In 2001 he received a demolition permit.

A preservationist group challenged Jobs's plan in court, arguing the Spanish Colonial-style mansion, built in 1926 and designed by renowned George Washington Smith, was a historic structure.

A lower-court judge sided with the opponents. That ruling was upheld on appeal, according to the Associated Press.

It's not the first time the local authorities have intervened in a high-tech mogul's attempt to build in Woodside. Oracle's Larry Ellison, who spent $100m and 10 years building a Japanese style villa, was forced to add reinforcements to man-made ponds to ensure they didn't flood local residents.

Wednesday's appeals decision against Jobs doesn't require him to restore the mansion, which is said to be in disrepair. Jobs reportedly said the mansion was "one of the biggest abominations of a house I've ever seen", so he is unlikely to be in a hurry to call in the remodelers.

Woodside's planning commission has estimated it would cost $10m to rehabilitate and refurbish the structure with living quarters, a work space and fitness facilities.

Howard Ellman, an attorney for Jobs, told the San Jose Mercury News that he and his client haven't decided how to respond. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Criticism of Uber's journo-Data Analytics plan is an Attack on DIGITAL FREEDOM
First they came for Emil – and I'm damn well SPEAKING OUT
'It is comforting to know where your data centres are.' UK.GOV does NOT
Plus: Anons are 'wannabes', KKK says, before being pwned
Google's whois results say it's a lousy smut searcher
Run whois google.com or whois microsoft.com. We dare you, you PIG◙◙◙◙ER
Holy vintage vehicles! Earliest known official Batmobile goes on sale
Riddle me this: are you prepared to pay US$180k?
'Open source just means big companies can steal your code.' O RLY?
Plus: Flame of the Week returns, for one night only!
NEWSFLASH: It's time to ditch dullard Facebook chums
Everything hot in tech, courtesy of avian anchor Regina Eggbert
Hey, you, PHONE-FACE! Kickstarter in-car mobe mount will EMBED your phone into your MUG
Stick it on the steering wheel and wait for the airbag to fire
prev story

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.