Feeds

Flash firm campaigns to connect USB keys to TVs

Flash drive as content delivery platform, anyone?

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

CES 2007 SanDisk this week used the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) to launch up its latest industry consortium chartered with furthering demand for USB Flash disks. A couple of years ago, it was the U3 takeway-apps technology. This time it's the USB TV Forum, a body whose goal is to persuade TV makers to equip their products with USB ports and the ability to display content stored thereupon.

Here's the plan: folk have photo, video and audio content stored on computers kept away from their TVs. According to SanDisk, USB Flash disks are the ideal way of getting all that material from the PC to the TV. Forget about authoring and burning DVDs, just drag and drop stuff you want to watch onto a Flash disk.

It's not an entirely original notion - Panasonic, for one, makes TVs with integrated SD card slots for much the same reason. And a number of vendors are beginning to equip - or think about equipping - their products with wired and/or wireless networking, again to help consumers get media off computers, NAS boxes and the like onto the small (ish) screen.

Indeed, Philips already makes TVs with USB ports. If the USB TV Forum has its way so will others. SanDisk named LG, Pioneer and Mitsubishi as consumer electronics companies who've taken an interest in the scheme.

But it's not just Flash disks that the USB TV Forum has its eye on. It wants handheld media players - such as SanDisk's own Sansa line - to be able to work in the same way, making it easy for users to connect their MP3 players to their TVs without resorting to TV-out ports. Crucially, it puts the TV remote in control of the content selection process rather than the handheld.

Again, all this isn't new - plenty of iPod dock accessories ship with TV links and remote controls, but a USB-based approach would at least provide a measure of uniformity, and potentially cut the number of remotes from two - TV and dock - to one, the TV's. ®

Read our complete CES 2007 coverage at Reg Hardware

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Just in case? Unverified 'supersize me' iPhone 6 pics in sneak leak peek
Is bigger necessarily better for the fruity firm's flagship phone?
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
TV transport tech, part 1: From server to sofa at the touch of a button
You won't believe how much goes into today's telly tech
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?