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Fasthosts says sorry

Hit by denial of service attack

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Hosting firm Fasthosts has apologized to customers who lost web servers held by the company because a denial of service attack.

The company offers a range of website and email hosting and other server hosting services.

In a statement sent to the Register Fasthosts said: "Just prior to 11:00am today we detected intermittent losses of connectivity inbound and outbound to our networks. Our monitoring systems indicated significant levels of traffic originating from multiple sources directed at our network, also known as a Distributed Denial of Service Attack.

"Our network team followed our standard procedures to stop this attack and all but one of our web servers were restored to normal service by 11:30am. This last web server is being worked on as a matter of urgency and will be back online shortly.

"We sincerely apologise for any impact this attack has caused our customers."

Fasthosts told the Reg that all customer data was safe.

Fasthosts last suffered downtime back in June when it was hit by fallout after two cables belonging to Telewest were deliberately damaged.®

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