Feeds

Car snoop fear dominates PM petitions

Right-on Britain also wants Ringo knighted

Intelligent flash storage arrays

British car lovers have told Prime Minister Tony Blair just how dearly they cling to the romantic idea that they can find freedom on an open road.

A protest over Department of Transport plans to have all cars in Britain tracked by satellite has topped the e-petitions web site launched by the Prime Minister last November.

A call for the government to "Scrap the planned vehicle tracking and road pricing policy" has attracted 152,628 signatories, nearly 9 times more than the second most popular plea, to ditch the hunting ban.

"The idea of tracking every vehicle at all times is sinister and wrong," said petitioner Peter Roberts in his call for road freedom, "Road pricing is already here with the high level of taxation on fuel. The more you travel - the more tax you pay."

In 2005 the government announced plans to have all cars install a black box that would allow satellites to track them and charge for every mile of their road use. The Association of Chief Police Officers also expressed a desire to use the system to remotely disable cars.

Such a plan could spell the end of the road movie as we know it.

A metropolitan theme can be traced down the list of top 50 petitions to the Prime Minister. No.3. on the list is an appeal to have identity cards scrapped.

Other petitions call for the banning of digital rights management (which prevents digital music being copied), fishing in British waters (to save fish stocks), and faith schools.

They also call for the government to prevent the Freedom of Information Act from being watered down, halt the proposed ban of violent pornography, cease the persecution of smokers, scrap tuition fees, legalise cannabis, build the world's best network of cycle lanes and give a knighthood to Ringo Star.

And blogger Tim Ireland has petitioned the Prime Minister to stand on his head and juggle ice cream.

Right on.®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express
Series finally hits stride, but Clara's U-turn is baffling
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.