Feeds

Car snoop fear dominates PM petitions

Right-on Britain also wants Ringo knighted

Application security programs and practises

British car lovers have told Prime Minister Tony Blair just how dearly they cling to the romantic idea that they can find freedom on an open road.

A protest over Department of Transport plans to have all cars in Britain tracked by satellite has topped the e-petitions web site launched by the Prime Minister last November.

A call for the government to "Scrap the planned vehicle tracking and road pricing policy" has attracted 152,628 signatories, nearly 9 times more than the second most popular plea, to ditch the hunting ban.

"The idea of tracking every vehicle at all times is sinister and wrong," said petitioner Peter Roberts in his call for road freedom, "Road pricing is already here with the high level of taxation on fuel. The more you travel - the more tax you pay."

In 2005 the government announced plans to have all cars install a black box that would allow satellites to track them and charge for every mile of their road use. The Association of Chief Police Officers also expressed a desire to use the system to remotely disable cars.

Such a plan could spell the end of the road movie as we know it.

A metropolitan theme can be traced down the list of top 50 petitions to the Prime Minister. No.3. on the list is an appeal to have identity cards scrapped.

Other petitions call for the banning of digital rights management (which prevents digital music being copied), fishing in British waters (to save fish stocks), and faith schools.

They also call for the government to prevent the Freedom of Information Act from being watered down, halt the proposed ban of violent pornography, cease the persecution of smokers, scrap tuition fees, legalise cannabis, build the world's best network of cycle lanes and give a knighthood to Ringo Star.

And blogger Tim Ireland has petitioned the Prime Minister to stand on his head and juggle ice cream.

Right on.®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
LightSquared backer sues FCC over spectrum shindy
Why, we might as well have been buying AIR
'Two-speed internet' storm turns FCC.gov into zero-speed website
Deadline for comments on net neutrality shake-up extended to Friday
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.