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AMD to ship Athlon 64 X2 6000+ 'next quarter'

Moles claim FX-76 out in Q2, too

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AMD will ship the Athlon 64 X2 6000+ and release the single-core Athlon 64 4000+ next quarter, it has been claimed. Both with be the last current-generation chips, allowing AMD to focus on its next-generation architecture, due to launch in Q3.

According to Asian hardware manufacturer sources cited by Chinese-language site HKEPC, the 6000+ will be clocked at 3GHz and contains 2MB of L2 cache. It's a 90nm part that consumes up to 89W of power. Specs for the Athlon 64 4000+ were not provided,m but we suggest it will be a 2.6GHz part with 512KB of L2 cache - the logical next step up from the current 2.4GHz 3800+.

The moles also claim AMD will next year roll out 65nm versions of the current Athlon 64 X2 5200+ and 5400+, followed by the 5600+ in Q3 2007. AMD currently offers 90nm X2s with these model numbers, but we're told to expect higher clock speeds in the 65nm versions to counterbalance a lower cache size.

The Athlon 64 FX line won't be updated, it seems, until Q2 2007, when the Quad FX-oriented FX-76 will launch, according to the report. Again, there's no spec published, but 3.2GHz seems the most likely clock speed. ®

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