Feeds

Home Office to register biometrics of foreign nationals in UK

Where's your fingerprint?

Build a business case: developing custom apps

The Home Office is considering the possibility of compelling foreign nationals in the UK to register their biometrics.

It said the power would be introduced on a rolling basis and would build on biometric IDs for foreign nationals, which will be introduced from 2008. The policy would target groups such as migrant workers seeking to extend their stay in the UK.

A Home Office spokesperson told GC News that, under regulations due to come into full effect by 2008, a biometric ID is required for people who are applying for a visa to enter the UK, and those living in the country who are applying for further leave to stay. The Home Office is considering extending the requirement to those who have a permanent right of residence.

This would require further legislation in Parliament if the Home Office decides to go ahead.

Biometric ID visas are currently issued at 42 posts overseas. It is planned that by 2008 the process will be in place for everyone outside the Euopean Economic Area nations who are coming to the UK to work, study or stay for longer than six months, plus anyone visiting from the 108 visa nations.

Immigration minister Liam Byrne said: "We're determined that Britain won't be a soft touch for illegal immigration. Compulsory biometric identity for foreign nationals will help us secure our borders, shut down access to the illegal jobs, which we know attracts illegal immigrants, and help fight foreign criminals.

"The technology is already making a difference, stopping illegal immigrants returning to Britain once they've been deported, helping trusted travellers pass securely through our borders and cutting down abuse of the asylum system."

The announcement was made along with the publication of the Borders, Immigration and Identity Action Plan.

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

Kablenet's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Just TWO climate committee MPs contradict IPCC: The two with SCIENCE degrees
'Greenhouse effect is real, but as for the rest of it ...'
Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart
Mega-costly gas 'n' 'leccy totting-up tech not worth it - Tory MP
'Blow it up': Plods pop round for chat with Commonwealth Games tweeter
You'd better not be talking about the council's housing plans
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.