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Captain Cyborg pays homage to El Reg

The mind boggles

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You've got to hand it to Kevin Warwick, aka Captain Cyborg: the bloke's got more front than Blackpool. In an interview this week with itwales.com, the cybernetic futurologist actually thanks El Reg for the extensive coverage we've dedicated to his groundbreaking work.

The interview is all pretty bog-standard Captain Cyborg fodder, which you can read at your peril. Here's the money shot, though:

Q: The nature of your research has led you to have quite a high profile in the media, and your work is often discussed on sites like The Register, but they don't seem to take you particularly seriously. How do you feel about this, and what's the knock on effect on your work?

A: The work does seem to have a high profile, which I guess is understandable. I think that anybody commenting on a regular basis on what I do must have an interest in it. At least every month there is a comment about me on The Register, and I think that if they didn't think there was any value whatsoever in what I do, there wouldn't be any comments at all.

It's understandable - I am doing some radical experiments, and some people may think they are a little bit strange, so it's good that sites like The Register question what I'm doing and whether it's right. It's another way of looking at it, that I think is probably a very good thing, and I applaud it. I love it that we live in a society where there are opportunities for people to question in this kind of way. At the same time, it does bring attention to the work that I'm doing - people may look at The Register, and find out more about my work as a result, then perhaps come along to a presentation that I'm giving, or have a look at one of my papers and find out that there's a bit more to it than The Register was probably implying.

I'm thankful to The Register for pointing out the research I am doing. Perhaps most people that look at the site have considerable technological nouse as it were, and so for them to find out more about what I'm doing is not a bad thing as far as I'm concerned.

Terrific. Warwick's assertion that "we live in a society where there are opportunities for people to question in this kind of way" is, of course, complete nonsense. We here at Vulture Central know for a fact that as soon as he acquires full cybernetic capability and superhuman robot strength he'll be straight round to terminate the lot of us. Accordingly, the plasma pulse laser rifles are on charge. Bring it on. ®

Bootnote

Thanks to Kevin O'Gara for the tip-off.

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