Feeds

Novell: in it for the interop, not the money

Stats show unanimous support for MS deal

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A jointly sponsored Microsoft and Novell survey purporting strong customer support for the companies’ controversial alliance looks like back firing on Novell.

While the poll of 201 IT executives with “significant” purchasing power found near unanimous support for interoperability between Linux and Windows, relatively few said they’d actually pick Novell’s SuSE Linux Server (SLES) as a result of the deal.

Sixty seven per cent said they are “more likely” to now consider SLES. Ninety five per cent, though, said collaboration between Microsoft and Novell will increase interoperability of IT systems while 97 per cent want platform providers to improve interoperability between their systems.

Such findings are unlikely to help Novell close the sales and market-share gap on Red Hat - one of the deal’s objectives with Microsoft acting as a SLES reseller. The poll’s findings confirm statements from Novell’s management last week indicating company revenue for 2007 is unlikely to be affected by contributions from Microsoft. Revenue is actually expected to come in lower than expected revenue for 2006.

If anything, the companies’ alliance is likely to increase demands on Red Hat from customers for price discounts on the threat of switching. A recent Pacific Crest poll of 118 IT purchasers found 64 per cent consider a price discount “very important” to continuing to do business with Red Hat. A majority want between a quarter and a half off.

Publication of the unanimous findings of the Microsoft/Novell poll is the companies’ latest attempt to shore up a crumbling and questionable alliance.

Novell has been heavily criticized for getting into bed with Microsoft, while the companies have themselves publicly disagreed over whether Linux violates Windows patents – the patent protection covenant is one of the deal’s central themes.

Novell chief executive Ron Hovsepian said Linux does not infringe patents while Microsoft’s CEO Steve Ballmer has claimed that Linux does infringe on Microsoft’s patents. The agreement to disagree raises significant questions over whether a problem exists and what type of protection Novell customers get from Microsoft.

The poll as a whole is also unlikely to dissuade those sceptical of Novell’s decision to get into bed with its former enemy. Novell has drawn on the research services of market research company Penn, Schoen & Berland, who lists Microsoft as a customer of eight years’ standing. Novell is not a customer, according to PSB’s web site.reg;

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.