Feeds

Music industry will take copyright battle to Europe

Damning the evidence

Boost IT visibility and business value

The recording industry's continuing bid to exploit works for an extra 45 years should be disregarded by government as not in the public interest.

That's according to Andrew Gowers, who delivered a wide-ranging review of intellectual property rights in the UK to the Treasury yesterday. The government accepted the recommendations of the review in the Pre-Budget Report.

Record industry trade body the BPI vowed to send lobbyists to Brussels to push for the extension when the European Commission reviews the relevant directive next year.

Gowers told The Register: "They [the EU] will surely be descended upon by the lobbyists in the coming months."

But the former journalist was confident in his findings on copyright term, which is among the first government-instigated examinations of the issue in the EU. He said: "I'm sure it will be read with particular interest in Europe."

The British music industry is healthier than its American counterpart, Gowers said, and any European moves to bow to pressure and ignore his evidence-based assessment would be "politics getting in the way".

BPI chairman Peter Jamieson accused the review of setting out to make the case against extension from the start. He said: "Gowers commissioned Cambridge economic research to argue the case against term extension."

The review employed Cambridge University's Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law to perform "an independent assessment of the economic evidence".

A record company whip-round paid for a full page advertisement in the Financial Times today to continue the battle. It calls for term extension under the heading "fair play for musicians". Gowers said his analysis had found the benefactors of an extension would mostly be "major record labels and their shareholders". ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.