Feeds

Samsung opts for TV with everything – in Korea

The haunted goldfish bowl goes mobile

Seven Steps to Software Security

Samsung is going TV crazy and adding terrestrial digital multimedia broadcasting (T-DMB) receivers to a wide range of its products. The latest product to appear in South Korea with a TV capability is the Q1, Samsung's ultra-mobile PC (UMPC).

Samsung digital media vice president David Steel said: "Television is proving to be very popular and we are bringing T-DMB versions of many of our products to the Korean market."

Samsung's phones, PDAs, PCs, UMPCs, notebooks and monitors are all sprouting 10cm aerials and T-DMB has been growing in popularity over the past year. Steel says models will be launched in the European and US markets as soon as the regulatory bodies finalise their plans.

T-DMB is the multimedia version of Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) which is currently being tested in the UK with the aim of launching services next year. A major problem will be bandwidth allocation and this may differ from country to country. Even if the European Union adopts the so-called L-band frequencies, the US will not follow because these frequencies are currently used by the military.

As with all wireless technologies, the real limitation to acceptance of T-DMB broadcasts will be battery life of the receivers. In the case of the Samsung Q1, battery life is currently around 2.5 hours at best. Mobile phone batteries generally give longer usage between charges but TV will soon drain the cells.

This means users will have to carefully manage their TV viewing habits or risk the possibility they will not be able to use the primary functions of their gadgets. The good news for the manufacturers is that T-DMB will probably boost sales of spare batteries.

Samsung is trying to keep product costs down for its latest devices. It hopes that falling prices for current components and improved manufacturing techniques will compensate for the T-DMB functionality and make the TV services look like a free feature. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.