Feeds

Doctors ambivalent about NHS IT

All very well, but is it worth the fuss?

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Doctors are still worried that patient confidentiality will be broken if treatment records are loaded onto the patient information network, the care records system, that is intended to span the country as the keystone of the late and great £12.4bn National Programme for IT (NPfIT).

They are also still narked about not being consulted properly over the plans, most being of the mind that a system designed to help them do their jobs should have consulted them more closely to find out how it should work, research firm Medix found in a survey (54 page .pdf) of 1,026 doctors (slightly more than half of respondents being hospital doctors).

Fifty-one per cent of GPs and 47 per cent of non-GP doctors said they would not or were unlikely to upload patient information to the care record system. Most of them thought it would make their patients' information less confidential.

The survey found that doctors were becoming increasingly critical of the system all round, particularly of how its costs had ballooned and how it was being implemented. This might not be of their direct concern, as long as it did the job when it was eventually up and running.

Indeed, most of them (58 per cent of GPs and 69 per cent of other doctors) think NPfIT will all come right in the end, no matter how much of a difficult birth it had.

Just about half of GPs and about 65 per cent of non-GPs think care records will help them make better decisions. More supported choose and book, which helps them make hospital appointments, since they have been using it.

However, 70 per cent of those who had used choose and book thought it "makes no difference or is detrimental to patient outcomes".

The more they had thought about the programme, the more they realised it wasn't a priority for the NHS. Sixty-seven per cent of doctors thought NPfIT was a priority for the NHS four years ago. Now, just 35 per cent do.

Most of them also did not think it was the best use of resources (76 per cent of GPs and 61 per cent of other doctors). ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Redmond resists order to hand over overseas email
Court wanted peek as related to US investigation
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.