Feeds

Zune and Vista 'not compatible'

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Zune, the new digital music player from Microsoft, is not compatible with the software giant's new Vista operating system. Buried in the Zune website, Microsoft admits that the player is not compatible with Vista and gives no information as to when it will introduce a patch or update enabling the player to do so.

Instead, users are asked to "check back soon for updates".

Microsoft is set to launch Vista for business customers later this month, although a spokesman for Microsoft told ENN, however, that a new "Zune client" or patch to make Vista compatible with the MP3 player will be released at the end of January to coincide with the consumer launch of the Vista operating system.

This is embarrassing for Microsoft given it launched the new player in the US amid much fanfare on Wednesday in an attempt to take on the might of Apple's iPod. At the same time, Microsoft is touting its much-delayed new Vista version of Windows as "the most important new Microsoft release since Windows 95", according to company founder Bill Gates.

Zune is currently only available in the US and went on sale for USD249.99 at almost 30,000 shops across the United States on Wednesday. The digital music player comes in just one 30GB model and is available in three colours: black, white and brown.

A European launch is expected some time next year.

Zune is designed to be used with its co-branded online music store Marketplace, where songs can be purchased for download.

The big difference between the Zune player and the iPod is that the Zune is wireless. The player comes with a Wi-Fi connection which will allow users to share music with other Zune users. Tracks may be shared with up to three other Zune owners, although shared songs will delete themselves after three days. Unlike the iPod, the Zune also includes an FM radio.

Microsoft hopes these features will help it corner some of the digital music player market dominated by rival Apple.

However, in what is sure to be an unpopular move, songs bought from Microsoft's own MSN music store - which is being closed down - will not work on a Zune player.

Instead Zune users must buy and download music from the dedicated Zune music store, or rip their own CDs and copy them onto the player.

Copyright © 2006, ENN

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?