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Apple developing AMD-based laptop?

Unexpected sources claim

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Apple is preparing a notebook computer based on an AMD microprocessor, it has been claimed by - of all people - sources from within Taiwan's high-capacitance multi-layer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) manufacturing community, though the reasoning behind the claim isn't entirely clear-cut.

The claim - cited by DigiTimes - appears to be based on an increase in demand for capacitors. It's not clear why an increased demand for these components should indicate an Apple AMD-based product, particularly when the same sources suggest AMD-based machines require fewer MLCCs than Intel-based ones do.

Just as pertinent a dampener on the Taiwanese moles' claim: Apple's MLCC suppliers are said to be Japanese not Taiwanese.

As we've noted before, now that Dell's started offering AMD-based systems, Apple is now the only company rumourmongers can turn to for claims that a major vendor is ditching its Intel-only policy.

It's hard to imagine Apple not at very least evaluating AMD processors, but the exclusivity of its deal with Intel would appear for now to outweigh the benefits of bringing a second source of CPUs on board. AMD's acquisition of ATI brings it chipset technology that would sweeten a deal for Apple - multiple components, one source - but again, AMD must first demonstrate better price:performance than Intel can. And with Core 2 Duo, Intel has the performance edge, for now at least. ®

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