Feeds

Warwick uni in emergency email upgrade

Power outage killed GroupWise

High performance access to file storage

The University of Warwick is upgrading its email system slightly ahead of schedule after a power outage temporarily downed its Novell GroupWise email system, permanently killing one of the boxes. The outage affected around 3,000 academic staff and critical services accounts.

A spokesman for the college says rumours of a failing UPS system are "not entirely true". He claims that after the power failure, a backup generator failed to kick in, despite a successful test run just a week earlier.

He told us the GroupWise system was the worst affected by the power problems. "Everything else was back up and running. It was obviously an inappropriate piece of software for us. It has been nothing but a headache since it was installed."

A statement on the University's site explains:

Major problems have affected some parts of the GroupWise email system used by staff and research students. Two of the Staff Post Offices - STAFF2 and STAFF3 - have experienced failures which are currently being worked on.

In the case of the STAFF2 Post Office, the failure is serious enough that we are expecting a prolonged recovery period - sufficiently long that it will not be practical for those customers with email provided on that Post Office to wait for it to return to regain access to send and receive emails."

The IT services team decided to shift as many accounts as possible over to a Microsoft Exchange pilot, ahead of schedule.

Staff at the university are "really hacked off" with GroupWise and have no kind words for the IT services team: "I'm really hacked off with GroupWise and I'm really hacked off that IT Services didn't listen to us years ago," one self-styled 'heavy user' told us. "We told them that the system wouldn't be sustainable, and sadly we have been proved right."

The IT boys, for their part, are keeping quiet. A team leader told us that none of them were authorised to make any statements about the failure. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Number crunching suggests Yahoo! US is worth less than nothing
China and Japan holdings worth more than entire company
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.