Feeds

IPTV/VoD: Get up to speed

Fast track your knowledge

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

  • IPTV content can be real-time (live) or offline (downloaded). It can also be pushed to a client device (e.g. overnight delivery) or pulled across the network.
  • Most ISP and telco networks are based on an old telecoms technology called ATM. The advent of broadband has meant most are upgrading their networks to be IP-based.
  • Almost all of the top 10 broadband ISPs in the UK now have a strategy of some kind for providing voice and television to their customers.
  • The most practical way for ISPs to enter the television market in the UK is to provide some form of hybrid TV/broadband service that adds a broadband "back channel" and PVR functionality to the Freeview or Freesat digital TV platforms.
  • BT's network is ATM-based and does not support multicast. The 21CN upgrade programme will change the UK infrastructure to be IP-based and is expected to be complete just before UK Digital TV Switchover in 2012.
  • IPTV video is usually supplied in MPEG-2, MPEG-4 and/or Windows Media (VC-1). The favourite choice is H.264 (MPEG-4 AVC) that can produce DVD-quality video at very low bandwidths (1-3Mbit/s for SD, 6-10Mbit/s for HD). Most need the video to be encapsulated in an MPEG-2 transport stream.
  • Most IPTV platforms use open standards and trusted protocols for delivering audio and video in real-time, such as RTP, RTSP, resilient UDP and SAP/SDP.
  • A normal 8Mb ADSL connection can theoretically support up to 3 SD IPTV channels or 1 HD channel in MPEG-4, but in practice it is difficult to send more than 1 on either. A DSL connection must usually be 4Mbit/s and above to support a live IPTV broadcast stream and 2Mbit/s for on-demand content.
  • Fiber (Gbit/s), Ethernet (100Mbit/s), ADSL2+ (24Mbit/s) and VDSL2 (70Mbit/s+) connections are a more preferable and reliable network speed to deploy IPTV over.
  • Video running over IP networks is easily disrupted, so in order to make sure the picture doesn’t break up a network must implement Quality Of Service (QoS) rules that separate voice, video and internet data into their own "channels".
  • The internet is a best-effort network and does not have QoS. IPTV provided by ISPs runs across their network but does not reach the internet. QoS is achieved by mapping ATM virtual circuits (VCs) to IP Virtual LAN groups (VLANs).
  • An IPTV testing lab or small simulation can be purchased and installed extremely cheaply and easily (less than $10k or £5k) on any office LAN to help cross-train developers and create example software applications (such as menus and screens).
  • The net neutrality or two-tier internet debate originated in the USA, and refers to a unilateral policy being adopted by US telcos of charging content providers more for using their network to deliver content than they do themselves.
  • It is almost impossible to reliably transmit broadcast video over a wireless (Wi-Fi) network, even if it runs at speeds over 108Mbps. Specialist technologies exist that try to solve this problem.
  • The easiest way to connect an IP set-top box to a broadband wire when it can’t be connected by a normal Ethernet cable (i.e. when it is in a different room to a home router) is to use PLC (powerline communication) – 200Mbps Ethernet networking over home electricity power cabling.
  • The future of the broadband home is to have embedded PLC technology in all electronic devices, so they are immediately network and internet-enabled when they are plugged into a normal electric power socket in any room in the home.
  • Live television must be multicasted over a network, which is the computer equivalent of normal broadcast where only one copy of a TV signal is sent instead of everyone having a personal (unicast) copy. Many networks do not support UDPbased multicast technology, including the internet.

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?