Feeds

HP sues InkTec over patents infringment

A right IP pen and ink

Security for virtualized datacentres

HP is suing the German subsidiary of Korean firm InkTec for infringing its printer-ink patents. The company claims that ink found in the InkTec branded cartridge refill kits violates patents held by HP.

In a statement, the company said it was pursuing the matter in Germany because that is where the refill kits are found. It did not specify which patent it alleges has been infringed, but said that the violation was discovered as part of an ongoing, global "testing and enforcement" effort.

"Over the past year, [this initiative] has uncovered ink patent infringements by other companies that offer generic ink supplies through refilling stations or 'private label' brands," the company said.

Pradeep Jotwani, senior VP of HP's supplies, imaging and printing group, commented: "With more than 4,000 supplies patents, representing a deep heritage of innovation, research and development, HP will continue to vigourously defend intellectual property violations wherever and whenever they are discovered."

HP's supplies business is where it makes its highest margins. The company's long-running press "education" campaigns extolling the virtues of HP original inks and papers over refills and generic alternatives, are testament to how jealously it guards this lucrative market. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.