Feeds

January 30: Window Vista's date with destiny

Broad appeal, says Allchin

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Microsoft has confirmed "broad" availability for Windows Vista on January 30, with only business customers on volume contracts receiving product before hand.

Jim Allchin, co-president for platforms and services, today told press that Windows Vista is feature-complete and ready to ship. OEMs will get code in advance of Microsoft's official November 30 launch event in New York.

Responding to questioning from The Register, Allchin promised there would be no major differences or changes to code between copies of Windows Vista that businesses get now and versions that become broadly available in January.

According to Allchin, who announced he had signed off the Windows Vista code that morning, hardware and software partners have got 10 weeks to "fine tune drivers and application compatibility to make sure they are great on Vista.

"In terms of our DVD and what we give computer manufacturers and retailers... [Windows Vista] won't change. If features and drivers are missing they will go on Windows Update. Features in Windows Update let [new] features trickle down."

According to Allchin OEMs will use the next 10 weeks to "take bits, tailor it for their environments and round out any things if ISVs haven't done compatibility testing." he declared himself "super happy" with Windows Vista and claimed 50 per cent more device driver compatibility than Windows XP, saying Windows Vista would run more hardware and applications out of the box.

New features in quality, performance and reliability mean Windows Vista is "substantially more reliable than Windows XP," he added. Microsoft's Windows evangelist believes businesses will jump on Windows Vista because of updates to security.

Consumer demand, he claimed, would be "fast and immediate" especially among gamers. "We'll be hard pressed to find a machine that won't have Windows Vista available [after January 30]," he said. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
'In... 15 feet... you will be HIT BY A TRAIN' Google patents the SPLAT-NAV
Alert system tips oblivious phone junkies to oncoming traffic
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.