Feeds

January 30: Window Vista's date with destiny

Broad appeal, says Allchin

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

Microsoft has confirmed "broad" availability for Windows Vista on January 30, with only business customers on volume contracts receiving product before hand.

Jim Allchin, co-president for platforms and services, today told press that Windows Vista is feature-complete and ready to ship. OEMs will get code in advance of Microsoft's official November 30 launch event in New York.

Responding to questioning from The Register, Allchin promised there would be no major differences or changes to code between copies of Windows Vista that businesses get now and versions that become broadly available in January.

According to Allchin, who announced he had signed off the Windows Vista code that morning, hardware and software partners have got 10 weeks to "fine tune drivers and application compatibility to make sure they are great on Vista.

"In terms of our DVD and what we give computer manufacturers and retailers... [Windows Vista] won't change. If features and drivers are missing they will go on Windows Update. Features in Windows Update let [new] features trickle down."

According to Allchin OEMs will use the next 10 weeks to "take bits, tailor it for their environments and round out any things if ISVs haven't done compatibility testing." he declared himself "super happy" with Windows Vista and claimed 50 per cent more device driver compatibility than Windows XP, saying Windows Vista would run more hardware and applications out of the box.

New features in quality, performance and reliability mean Windows Vista is "substantially more reliable than Windows XP," he added. Microsoft's Windows evangelist believes businesses will jump on Windows Vista because of updates to security.

Consumer demand, he claimed, would be "fast and immediate" especially among gamers. "We'll be hard pressed to find a machine that won't have Windows Vista available [after January 30]," he said. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Mozilla keeps its Beard, hopes anti-gay marriage troubles are now over
Plenty on new CEO's todo list – starting with Firefox's slipping grasp
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.