Feeds

MS climbs down over Vista licensing

Just in time for 30 November release

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Microsoft has backed down to fierce criticism over proposed licensing terms for Windows Vista to allow users to uninstall the forthcoming operating system and install it on another PC.

Previously the software giant was only going to permit one re-install before obliging users to re-purchase the operating system, if they wanted it to function properly.

Terms regarding the license-to-device assignment of the retail versions of the OS (including Home Basic, Home Premium, Business and Ultimate) have been revised to state: "You may uninstall the software and install it on another device for your use. You may not do so to share this license between devices."

News of the rethink came in a posting on the Windows Vista blog by product manager Nick White who explains that the software giant has come to realise that the original terms, geared to fighting piracy, were restrictive to the point that they might alienate hardware enthusiasts.

"Our intention behind the original terms was genuinely geared toward combating piracy; however, it’s become clear to us that those original terms were perceived as adversely affecting an important group of customers: PC and hardware enthusiasts," White writes. "You who comprise the enthusiast market are vital to us for several reasons, not least of all because of the support you’ve provided us throughout the development of Windows Vista. We respect the time and expense you go to in customizing, building and rebuilding your hardware and we heard you that the previous terms were seen as an impediment to that - it’s for that reason we’ve made this change."

In other Vista-related news, Microsoft has set 30 November as the release date for Vista (and Office 2007) to business users. The OS is due to become available to consumers on 30 January 2007. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.