Feeds

Protect Data acquires Reflex

Port control

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Mobile device security firm Protect Data has acquired privately held UK-base security outfit Reflex Software and its subsidiaries in a deal valued at up to £15m ($28.6m). Protect Data will pay £12.5m in cash up front followed by up to £2.5m more providing Reflex meets sales targets by the end of March 2007.

The deal allows Protect Data to add port and device control technology to its Pointsec data protection product portfolio. Reflex Software and its subsidiaries have 35 employees who brought in sales of £3.1m in the fiscal year ending 31 March 2006. Reflex Software is a holding company managing the shares in Reflex Magnetics Ltd and Reflex Software Europe SARL. Reflex Magnetics’ product Disknet Pro allows enterprises and government agencies to control the use of all communication ports on clients, including access to attached peripherals. The technology can be use to prevent data transfer to USB memory devices or to block access to P2P file sharing networks. The firm also markets an enterprise encryption product called DataVault.®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?