Feeds

Civil Aviation Authority puts 'secret' security info on the web

Don't right-click! It's a secret!

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Updated: Observant Reg readers will have noticed the recent kerfuffle about airport security so why is the Civil Aviation Authority publishing supposedly secret documents on its website?

A document by the UK's Civil Aviation Authority, and posted on its website, contained blacked out sections containing: "RESTRICTED and CONFIDENTIAL information". The note continues: "This information can not be publicised in any way outside the CAA and can not be included in any public consultation documentation."

The eight page pdf is an application from British Airports Authority to suspend payment of rebates triggered by delays caused by extra security. BAA complains that it is impossible to meet its target of ten minutes queueing time because of "enhanced security reqirements". Several sections of the document are blacked out. But they can be easily accessed by right-clicking on the relevant section or using the read-aloud feature of Adobe Acrobat.

Like many "secret" documents they make rather dry and dull reading and for that reason, and in the interests of not going to prison, we're not going to share them with you.

The document was linked to from at least two pages on the CAA website.

A Register reader spotted the cock-up last night and tried, without success, to report it to the CAA's 24 hour emergency line.

He told us: "It was freely available. I was just looking around the site. I opened the pdf, saw the yellow warning notice and kept scrolling down. It was perfectly visible because my screen settings are a bit weird."

We contacted the CAA to request the removal of the document before publishing this story. Which they did. Eventually.

The CAA sent us this statement: "The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) was today made aware that a document provided to it for publication on its website contained information which, although blacked out, could still be accessed using a particular set of procedures.

The CAA immediately removed the document from its website, and thanks the Register for bringing this to the CAA's attention.

®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
'Internet Freedom Panel' to keep web overlord ICANN out of Russian hands – new proposal
Come back with our internet! cries Republican drawing up bill
What a Mesa: Apple vows to re-use titsup GT sapphire glass plant
Commits to American manufacturing ... of secret tech
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.