Feeds

eMusic cuts quotas

Cuts annual subs too

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The No.2 legal music service, eMusic, is cutting the number of tracks Stateside subscribers are permitted to download each month.

The basic monthly allowance falls to 40 from 30 songs (a 25 per cent cut), the Plus allowance falls from 65 to 50 songs (a 23 per cent cut), while the Premium cap is down to 75 songs, from 90 - a 16 per cent cut.

Prices for all three monthly plans remain the same. eMusic is hoping that users of the hit service - it's the fastest-growing rival to iTunes - will upgrade to an annual plan, which are on offer at the moment.

(Subscribers can also buy booster packs.)

"We have a much bigger catalog than we had when we relaunched in 2003 - 1.7m songs as opposed to 250,000 - and the web site is much more sophisticated too," A spokesperson for eMusic in New York told us.

The economics of eMusic is complex. The service depends on the same logic as a health club, acknowledges CEO David Pakman - occasional users subsidize heavy users. If the average number of songs a subscriber downloads increases, there's a significant bottom line impact.

So was eMusic becoming a victim of its own success, we wondered?

"We still offer the best value out of any download service, 25 cents a track," eMusic told us, sidestepping the question. "We're offering people more so we feel can we can charge more for it."

Cuts to the 1-year and 2-year plans suggest eMusic wants to move its loyal customer base onto longer contracts. The price of these plans has been cut as the monthly quotas have been capped. Annual subscriptions range from 40 downloads per month for $124 per year to 90 per month for $244 per year. The top two-year option permits 90 songs per month for $359.82, equivalent to $14.99 a month.

Unlike rival subscription services, eMusic doesn't lock or time-bomb the songs with Digital Rights Management, so customers keep their music unhindered.

eMusic claims 12 per cent of the legal download market, behind Apple's iTunes Store. The new monthly plans take effect from November 17. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
4chan outraged by Emma Watson nudie photo leak SCAM
In the immortal words of Shaggy, it wasn't me us ... amirite?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.