Feeds

Stern outlines moral duty to tackle climate change

Foresees shrunken global economy

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The Stern Review, a government-commissioned report on climate change, is set to warn that unchecked global warming could shrink the world economy by as much as 20 per cent, or £3.68 trillion.

Sir Nicholas Stern, former chief economist of the World Bank, says one per cent of that sum must be spent, now, to combat climate change and cut global carbon emissions.

Gordon Brown is expected to respond to the report by championing more emissions trading, and by employing old mate and ex-US vice president Al Gore as an adviser on green issues.

Tony Blair, meanwhile, has taken steps to alert the public by setting out the main points of the report in The Sun.

Brown will propose that the EU commit to targets of a 30 per cent reduction in carbon emissions by 2020, and a 60 per cent reduction by 2050. He wants to see the embryonic European carbon trading scheme extended and linked to other markets, such as California.

However, the Stern Report identifies the US and China as key to halting climate change. Without getting two of the most polluting economies on board, carbon cuts in the UK will be swamped by increases elsewhere.

Stern paints a bleak picture. He warns that the "catastrophic climate change" for which we are heading will create hundreds of millions of refugees. One hundred million could be displaced by rising sea levels alone.

As many as 40 per cent of species could go extinct, and up to one in six people will face severe water shortages as a result of melting glaciers.

To tackle the economic crisis he foresees, Stern asks the international community to agree on a successor to Kyoto next year, rather than waiting till 2011 as originally planned. He describes it as our "moral duty" to reduce emissions, as failure to do so will hit the poorest nations of Africa first, and hardest.

The Stern Review is the first assessment of the likely impact of climate change produced by an economist, rather than from within the mainstream academic community. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Lawyers mobilise angry mob against Apple over alleged 2011 Macbook Pro crapness
We suffered 'random bouts of graphical distortion' - fanbois
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
Verizon bankrolls tech news site, bans tech's biggest stories
No agenda here. Just don't ever mention Net neutrality or spying, ok?
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.