Feeds

Red Hat promises to keep charging customers double

Take your fork and shove it, Oracle

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Red Hat has struck out against Oracle's Linux support move by reassuring customers that it won't lower its prices.

"Our actions and our strategy remain intact," Red Hat CEO Matt Szulik, told reporters. Oracle this week vowed to create its own version of Linux by peeling the Red Hat label off the company's server operating system. The database maker will then support Red Hat users for half the cost that Red Hat currently charges. All the while, Oracle plans to make its own additions to Red Hat Linux and hopes that Red Hat will include those changes with its future operating system releases.

Red Hat isn't terribly fond of this plan, especially after investors cut its share price by 25 per cent, following Oracle's announcement.

Beyond promising to keep its support prices high, Red Hat has now started a smear campaign against Oracle.

"Oracle has stated they will make changes to the code independently of Red Hat," the company writes on its Unfakeable web site. "As a result these changes will not be tested during Red Hat's hardware testing and certification process, and may cause unexpected behavior. Hence Red Hat hardware certifications are invalidated."

Red Hat adds, "There is no way to guarantee that changes made by Oracle will maintain API (Application Programming Interface) or ABI (Application Binary Interface) compatibility; there may be material differences in the code that will result in application failures. Compatibility with Red Hat Enterprise Linux can only be verified by Red Hat's internal test suite."

And, Red Hat then went on to play the "fork card."

"The changes Oracle has stated they will make will result in a different code base than Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Simply put, this derivative will not be Red Hat Enterprise Linux and customers will not have the assurance of compatibility with the Red Hat Enterprise Linux hardware and application ecosystem."

Give Oracle CEO Larry Ellison supreme credit for triggering this war of words.

Myriad skeptics have chimed in with their concerns about Oracle's Linux play. They reckon the company is underestimating the concerns customers will have about making sure all of their other software works with Oracle Linux. In addition, pundits claim that Oracle has underestimated the time and costs associated with certifying all the bits and pieces that surround a Linux operating system.

Without doubt, Oracle's Linux move is little more than a public relations ploy at this point. The company will need to work hard to secure a few major customers. Until such customers arrive, Oracle will be little more than an afterthought in the Linux OS game.

Red Hat, however, has fallen right into Oracle's trap. It's banging on about Linux forks and keeping its prices high - a most defensive posture. With its stock price already clobbered, Red Hat could have stepped up the contest by announcing a price reduction of its own. Everyone knows the company has been overcharging for its services for years - simply because it had very little competition.

Linux customers should rejoice that a company with Oracle's clout rather than the hapless Novell has come to their rescue.

Of course, when all is said and one, the cost of Linux support trails that of the hardware and, er, database costs by quite a margin. Dave Dargo at Ingres has done the dirty work breaking down the figures.

Let the bashing continue. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.