Feeds

SGI smacks ATI with graphics lawsuit

And vows 'there's more to come'

Application security programs and practises

When SGI's boss Dennis McKenna vowed to get serious about the bankrupt company's IP portfolio this summer, he wasn't kidding.

"We have a hell of a lot of IP left," he told The Register at the time.

A day after it returned to NASDAQ (under a new stock ticker) SGI has filed suit against ATI claiming patent infringement. SGI claims ATI violated patent number 6,650,327, "Display system having floating point rasterization and floating point framebuffering", which was filed in 1998 and granted in 2003, in its Radeon graphics cards.

The patent allows software to operate directly on data in a frame buffer and, in a statement, McKenna described it as "an important resource in achieving enhanced graphics processing demanded by today's computer systems".

SGI said other manufacturers had licensed the patent and hinted there was more litigation to come:

"SGI has licensed this technology to ATI's major competitors and, as I have previously been stating publicly, SGI intends to aggressively protect and enforce its IP. This is the first visible step in that process."

ATI has yet to comment. In July AMD announced a $4.2bn takeover of ATI, which it still hopes to complete by the end of the year.

SGI hasn't always been so vigilant with its patent portfolio. In 1998 the company surprisingly caved in to Nvidia before a court case, which it was expected to win, came to court. Former company executives say the decision "sealed the company's fate". And in 2001 the company transferred key 3D patents to Microsoft - in a move the company initially denied had happened. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Attack of the clones: Oracle's latest Red Hat Linux lookalike arrives
Oracle's Linux boss says Larry's Linux isn't just for Oracle apps anymore
THUD! WD plonks down SIX TERABYTE 'consumer NAS' fatboy
Now that's a LOT of porn or pirated movies. Or, you know, other consumer stuff
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.