Feeds

IBM wades into Amazon for patent infringement

Oi - we invented ordering things online...

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

IBM today announced it had filed two patent infringement lawsuits against ecommerce monolith Amazon.com.

The lawsuits reportedly accuse Amazon of "willfully" violating IBM patents for "such services as allowing users to order items from an electronic catalog and displaying internet advertising".

IBM listed the patents it reckons Amazon defiled as:

  • US 5,796,967 - Presenting Applications in an Interactive Service.
  • US 5,442,771 - Storing Data in an Interactive Network.
  • US 7,072,849 - Presenting Advertising in an Interactive Service.
  • US 5,446,891 - Adjusting Hypertext Links with Weighted User Goals and Activities.
  • US 5,319,542 - Ordering Items Using an Electronic Catalogue.

According to Yahoo!, Dr John E. Kelly III, senior vice president of IBM Technology and Intellectual Property, declared: "We filed this case for a very simple reason. IBM's property is being knowingly and unfairly exploited.

"IBM is one of the world's leading creators of intellectual property and one of the most progressive in embracing new, highly collaborative ways of driving and managing innovation. Everything we do is premised on the fundamental principle that IBM's intellectual property is one of our core assets, and represents the work product of tens of thousands of scientists and engineers and billions of dollars of investment."

Mercifully, a quick search of the United States Patent and Trademark Office revealed that IBM does not appear to hold a patent on the entire concept of ecommerce.

Its claim, however, is not without precedent. Patent kerfuffle aficionados will remember Amazon's successful attack on Barnes & Noble.com which proved that it alone could claim to have invented the "1-Click" system "allowing customers to make repeat purchases at a website with just one mouse click, storing customer details for future use". ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?