Feeds

Computer factory workers show 'elevated' risk of cancer

As if wearing a bunny suit wasn't bad enough

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A study of workers at computer plants in the US has shown an “elevated” chance of contracting and dying of cancer.

A study conducted by a US academic, Richard Clapp, and published in Environmental Health, covered 31,941 individuals who died between 1969 and 2001, and who had spent five years or more working in computer or semiconductor manufacturing plants.

The study found death rates for all cancers were elevated in both males and females who had worked in computer plants. At the same time, there were reduced deaths due to non-malignant respiratory disease in males and females, and of heart disease in females. (Are any computer plants not non-smoking?)

More specifically, the study found higher rates of: brain and central nervous system cancer, while kidney cancer, melanoma of skin and pancreatic cancer were significantly elevated in male manufacturing workers. Kidney cancer and cancer of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue were significantly elevated in female workers.

The figures were enough for Clapp to conclude that mortality was elevated due to specific cancers, and amongst workers more likely to be exposed to solvents and other chemical exposures in manufacturing. However, there wasn’t sufficient information to pointy the finger at any particular agents.

There’s no doubt that computer and semiconductor manufacturing involves some nasty substances and processes, including arsenic, nickel and chromium, not to mention electromagnetic fields.

Earlier studies had suggested that computer plant workers had suggested higher cancer rates.

The data Clapp used was produced during a lawsuit in which IBM was sued by former plant workers. In the report, Clapp, an epidemiologist at Boston University School of Public Health, was “paid a consultancy by the plaintiff’s law firm” but that the law firm did not design the study or review or approve the report. Clapp was not paid for preparing the report in the journal.

The full report is here

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years
Man jailed for dodgy cinema recording of Hollywood movie
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?