Feeds

Storage Expo: who's excited?

ZZ Top on snowboards

Security for virtualized datacentres

Blog At times, the show floor at Storage Expo looks beardier than the biennial Taliban ZZ Top fan club dinner and no dancing. We've come to terms with it though: this is the fugly end of IT, rampant hirsutism is to be expected.

The show is the UK's only dedicated storage event. And it shows: every vendor is represented one way or another. But as is the case with trade shows today, there's no new announcements, not really. NetApp coughed up an update to its virtual tape offering yesterday, but its coincidence with Storage Expo is probably just that.

There's a notable dearth of top executives from the big vendors too. They keep their powder dry for IDC's Storage Networking World events in the States and Germany.

The event is refreshingly business-like, however. There's no wannabe catalogue models punting USB flash drives, or sozzled Far Eastern executives making loud random vocalisations along to the oompah band (we're looking at you, CeBit).

Storage Expo occupies one of the lesser halls at London's Olympia. Word is it's been a busy year on the stands, and plenty of business has been done. There's certainly no shortage of delegates, and chillingly, they didn't seem to mind queueing in biting winds at 9am to get into a networked storage event. Some of them even looked excited, God love 'em.

The main hall is currently occupied by a snowboarding exhibition, which could make for an interesting Venn diagram, if we could be bothered to take a poll; storage fanciers versus snowboarders. Something tells us the crossover would be minimal.

Not that anyone cares. The mood among many vendor footsoldiers at the show is bouyant to the point of crystal meth suspicion. The recent IPOs of Riverbed and Commvault have convinced many that they're sitting on a goldmine over the next couple of years, despite the shaky economic outlook across the Pond.

Consolidation of the plethora of tinpot start-ups is inevitable though, so some industry watchers mutter it could be a smart move to make a big noise and get bought posthaste. The only problem in the meantime might be working out how to look like they're spending the cash they've raised in a Wall Street-pleasing manner.

Now, if you'll excuse us, we've got a millimetre of stubble we need to shave sharpish.®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.