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UK retail giant canes Canis Canem Edit

DSG will not stock title in 'family friendly' outlets

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Controversial game designer Rockstar will not see its take on Bash Street, Canis Canem Edit - aka Bully - on sale in shops owned by UK retail giant DSG, it has emerged. The reason? The chain believes the title is "not appropriate" for its "family-friendly image".

Canis Canem Edit goes on sale in Europe on 27 October. It puts the player in control of young thug Jimmy Hopkins as he muscles his way to the top, duffing up the ticks, avoiding a canings and dodging mad maths masters, during a year at Bullworth Academy, "the worst school around".

rockstar games bully/canis canem edit

Rockstar reckons the title, which has a '15' certificate, is suitable tongue-in-cheek not to be taken seriously and claims it does not condone bullying. But DSG's clearly not convinced. It admitted today it will not stock the game in its PC World, Currys Digital stores on the nation's high streets and its Dixons.co.uk online store, GamesIndustry.biz reports.

"We have no plans to stock Canis Canem Edit," said a statement from DSG subsidiary Currys. "We're fully aware people will be able to buy this game elsewhere, but we feel this game is not appropriate for Currys' family-friendly image."

rockstar games bully/canis canem edit

"We have a good relationship with the game's producers, Rockstar, and look forward to working with them going forward," the retailer added. Indeed, the company is taking pre-orders for future episodes of the Grand Theft Auto series, the report noted.

Canis Canem Edit was originally titled Bully - it retains that name in the US - but renamed after its portrayal of violence in a school setting was criticised by a anti-bullying groups and UK Labour MP Keith Vaz, who today named the game in a parliamentary question to the Prime Minister.

Bully went on sale in the US this week, but it's already been targetted by veteran anti-videogames campaigner Jack Thompson, who wants it declared a "public nuisance". ®

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