Feeds

UK retail giant canes Canis Canem Edit

DSG will not stock title in 'family friendly' outlets

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Controversial game designer Rockstar will not see its take on Bash Street, Canis Canem Edit - aka Bully - on sale in shops owned by UK retail giant DSG, it has emerged. The reason? The chain believes the title is "not appropriate" for its "family-friendly image".

Canis Canem Edit goes on sale in Europe on 27 October. It puts the player in control of young thug Jimmy Hopkins as he muscles his way to the top, duffing up the ticks, avoiding a canings and dodging mad maths masters, during a year at Bullworth Academy, "the worst school around".

rockstar games bully/canis canem edit

Rockstar reckons the title, which has a '15' certificate, is suitable tongue-in-cheek not to be taken seriously and claims it does not condone bullying. But DSG's clearly not convinced. It admitted today it will not stock the game in its PC World, Currys Digital stores on the nation's high streets and its Dixons.co.uk online store, GamesIndustry.biz reports.

"We have no plans to stock Canis Canem Edit," said a statement from DSG subsidiary Currys. "We're fully aware people will be able to buy this game elsewhere, but we feel this game is not appropriate for Currys' family-friendly image."

rockstar games bully/canis canem edit

"We have a good relationship with the game's producers, Rockstar, and look forward to working with them going forward," the retailer added. Indeed, the company is taking pre-orders for future episodes of the Grand Theft Auto series, the report noted.

Canis Canem Edit was originally titled Bully - it retains that name in the US - but renamed after its portrayal of violence in a school setting was criticised by a anti-bullying groups and UK Labour MP Keith Vaz, who today named the game in a parliamentary question to the Prime Minister.

Bully went on sale in the US this week, but it's already been targetted by veteran anti-videogames campaigner Jack Thompson, who wants it declared a "public nuisance". ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?
And yes it does need a fat HDD (or SSD, it's cool with either)
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Just in case? Unverified 'supersize me' iPhone 6 pics in sneak leak peek
Is bigger necessarily better for the fruity firm's flagship phone?
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.