Feeds

Free virus with some iPods

Apple blames Windows, contract manufacturer, self ...

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Apple today apologised for selling a "small number" of video iPods infected with the RavMone.exe virus. Pox-ridden ipods accounted for less than one per cent of the video iPods hitting the streets after September 12.

The company says it has seen "less than 25 reports" concerning this problem. Well, we've had one from Reg reader Richard, who by Apple's calculation represents slightly more at four per cent of victims. He bought his 30gig vPod from Argos, the UK mass market retailer, on 7 October.

Then there is 'dctrjons', another four per center, who shared his RavMone.exe problems with Apple's own forums on 22 September.

JUST bought a 30Gig video Ipod. I connected it, downloaded the Itunes software and then sync'd my music and Podcasts. After which I changed the settings to use the Ipod as a drive. Instructed I would have to manually eject the drive.

Well I told ITunes to do so - "Cannot drive is still in use" Closed ITunes and tried to eject it from Windows explorer and was given the same error. Closed all programs, taskbar, disconnected from the internet, still no luck.

Finally opened task manager and being very familiar with all processes that are legal on my machine I found 3 RavMonE.exe's running. Googled it and I have found several references but 99% of them are in foreign language and many relate to IPods...but did not bother to translate myself.

So my question is, anyone else JUST get an Ipod and see encounter this. I see someone else stating there computer was locked up...I noticed severe slowdown when I went through trouble-shooting. I forcibly closed the RavMonE.exe processes and my IPod started working fine.

Of course, as Apple notes, only Windows PCs are affected by RavMone - so Apple computer owners will neither know nor care if their iPods are infected. Apple also aims at boot at the unnamed contract manufacturer which supplied the dodgy iPods.

But let's face it, the company has messed up a little and has to show some contrition, not an act that comes naturally to this secretive, paranoid company. Here's its mea culpa: "As you might imagine, we are upset at Windows for not being more hardy against such viruses, and even more upset with ourselves for not catching it."

And here, for vPod owner Richard and the other four per centers, is a link to the Apple advisory, complete with disinfection routines. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
A moment of brilliance? UPnP for Internet of Stuff lightbulbs
Thus doth tech of future illuminate present, etc
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.