Feeds

Irish take dim view of 'immoral' domains

No porn.ie for you, sunshine

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Here's a Monday afternoon poser: what's the difference between www.murder.ie and www.porn.ie?

Well, according to the owner of sex.ie, the former is an acceptable domain name according to the IE Domain Registry's naming policy, while the latter is proscribed under said policy's validity guidelines.

Specifically, the rules state: "The proposed domain name must not be offensive or contrary to public policy or generally accepted principles of morality."

Accordingly, the IE Domain Registry has blocked repeated attempts by sex.ie to acquire porn.ie. The disgruntled applicant explains:

For quite a while now, I've been trying to register the domain "Porn.ie". I've been rejected each time because - according to the IE Domain Registry - the word "porn" is offensive and immoral. To get around this I tried to register "porn" as a business name, but alas, the Companies Registration Office think "porn" is an offensive word.

Just so we're clear here, they aren't saying the act of porn is offensive or immoral, they're saying the word is.

This baffles me for a number of reasons. How is a word immoral? The act of rape is immoral, but the word "rape" isn't. The act of murder is immoral, but the word "murder" isn't. Why doesn't this logic apply to porn, whether or not they think porn is immoral?

Cue Slashdot's take on the matter, which kicks off thus: "Porn.ie is a poor example, since pornography has been a strict superset of free speech since the 1960's; how about: juden-raus.ie? juden-raus.ie, I suspect, would convert many here into willing censors."

Yup, the keen-eyed among you will have spotted the main debating point here. Strict superset? Oh dear, oh dear:

If pornography was a superset of free speech, strict or otherwise, then all free speech would be porn. What you mean is that porn is not a subset of free speech. But I think in Ireland, which is fairly conservative IIRC, it might actually be a disjoint set to free speech.

At this point, we decided we didn't give a tinker's cuss about immoral Irish domain names, but in the interests of something approaching journalism, went and sniffed around a few potential "offensive or immoral" crowd pleasers. Take, for example, poguemahone.ie, which is currently "not registered within the IE Zone". Neither does bollox.ie register on the IEDR radar, which, since both are highly desirable URLS, leads us to suspect they may have been blocked.

There is, however, hope for Irish civil libertarians and professional pornographers in the form of feck.ie, which we reckon is a pretty good substitute for porn.ie. ®

Bootnote

Other domains "not registered within the IE Zone" include milf.ie, cock.ie, pussy.ie and cumslurpingstrumpets.ie, a fact which leads us to wearily concede the IEDR really does take this porn thing rather seriously.

For the record, the sex.ie bloke is right about murder.ie, but no-one to date has taken it upon themselves to register rape.ie.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.