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Bluetooth SIG launches TransSend app

Grab bits of data and send them to your phone

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The Bluetooth SIG has today launched its TransSend application, allowing websites to embed a chunk of data, such as an address or map, in a web page and have it copied to a mobile phone at the click of a mouse.

Of course, the (Windows) desktop computer will need Bluetooth, and to be running Internet Explorer, but the process is painless and the range of compatible handsets impressive. A small client application is needed on the desktop, which can be downloaded free from the Bluetooth SIG website and works with just about any Bluetooth-equipped handset.

Should a site lack a special TransSend link, any text or image can simply be highlighted and a right-click allows it to be sent to the phone, which should encourage users to download the client application.

If you've ever searched for a pen to write down an address while hurrying to leave, or wished there was an easy way to take a map with you without printing it out, TransSend would seem ideal: but we'll have to wait for Firefox compatibility before it's really useful. ®

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