Feeds

ID Cards to cost £5.4bn

Home Office guesstimate

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The Home Office has announced how much it thinks ID cards are going to cost us - a mere £5.4bn.

This is a snip compared to what some independent observers reckon the program will cost. Last year The London School of Economics (LSE) put a price tag of upto £19.2bn on the ID card scheme.

The Home Office reckongs it will cost £290m to set-up passport and ID cards for British and Irish citizens resident in the UK for October 2006 to October 2016 and operational costs will be £5.1bn.

That figure, you'll be glad to hear, includes: "provision for optimism bias". "Optimism bias is a percentage uplift added to key cost parameters. It is based on the tendency for appraisers to be over-optimistic in the forecast of capital costs, works duration, operating costs and benefits delivery."

Biometric cards will be introduced for foreign nationals in 2008 and will then roll out to all UK nationals.

On the technology the report says: "A review of the technical development options. This has identified opportunities to use existing assets and resources available across Government which might reduce delivery and cost risks e.g. in the development of database solutions to implement the National Identity Register."

The Home Office is acquiring and fitting out 69 offices around the country ahead of the introduction of interviews for first time passport applicants.

Of course it would be unfair to point out the difference between previous government estimates of the costs of IT projects and the reality is enormous. That is presumably why section 37 of the Act requires the government to release an estimate of likely costs every six months.

The statement includes the usual toot such as: "the Scheme has the potential to make the work of police in detecting crime a lot easier. Detection rates could increase as a direct result,". The report claims ID cards will save the country between £1bn and £1.7bn a year.

The release should be on the Home Office website shortly.

The report claims ID cards will provide between £1bn and £1.7bn in economic benefits to the UK. Identity fraud currently costs the country £1.7bn a year.®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Yes, yes, Steve Jobs. Look what I'VE done for you lately – Tim Cook
New iPhone biz baron points to Apple's (his) greatest successes
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.