Feeds

Airline passenger data deal struck

Push-me, pull-you

Remote control for virtualized desktops

European Union and US negotiators have struck a new deal on sharing airline passenger data, resolving concerns that failure to reach an accord before a 1 October legal deadline might affect trans-Atlantic air travel.

An agreement struck on Thursday replaced a previous agreement ruled unlawful by the European Court of Justice in May.

The previous agreement involved airlines sending 34 items of data — including passengers' names, addresses and credit card details — about people flying from European to US destinations to US authorities within 15 minutes of a plane's departure. The procedures were put in place after the 11 September terrorist attacks.

The European Court of Justice ruled that the agreement had no basis in EU law but permitted the practice to continue until the 30 September deadline. EU and US negotiators failed to agree on terms before this deadline. The airlines were in a difficult position - in theory, at least - risking prosecution by data protection agencies in European countries if they complied with US rules and fines of up to $6,000 per passenger and loss of landing rights if they failed to co-operate with US authorities.

The new agreement, hammered out over video-conference, will allow US authorities to distribute passenger data outside the Customs and Border Protection agency. It will apply until the end of July 2007. The previous scheme allowed border protection officers to "pull" data from airline systems, whereas under the new arrangement data will be "pushed" to the US Department of Homeland Security, which will distribute it to US counter-terrorism and border control agencies, the BBC reports.

"This new agreement will provide a possibility of giving passenger data to the US authorities while guaranteeing sufficient data protection," said Leena Luhtanen, Justice Minister of Finland, the country currently in the rotating EU presidency hot-seat.

EU justice ministers are due to meet later on Friday to discuss the new arrangement, which is likely to be formally accepted next week. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Big Content outs piracy hotbeds: São Paulo, Beijing ... TORONTO?
MPAA calls Canadians a bunch of bootlegging movie thieves
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
Verizon bankrolls tech news site, bans tech's biggest stories
No agenda here. Just don't ever mention Net neutrality or spying, ok?
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
Simplify SSL certificate management across the enterprise
Simple steps to take control of SSL across the enterprise, and recommendations for a management platform for full visibility and single-point of control for these Certificates.