Feeds

A compromise in European patenting debate?

Unexpected move

Website security in corporate America

A week ahead of the European Parliament's vote on the European Patent Litigation Agreement (EPLA), the three major groups of MEPs that had been opposing the EPLA have unexpectedly reached a compromise agreement that means they will instead vote for the proposal.

Anti-software patent campaigner Florian Mueller described the proposals put forward by the conservative EPP-ED, the social democratic PES and the libertarian ALDE as a "pretty reasonable compromise", and a "defensive victory" for the anti-EPLA movement.

"Since those three groups have about 550 of the chamber's 732 seats, it's a mere formality for that compromise proposal to be carried by a solid majority," he writes.

The document calls for "significant improvements" to be made to the EPLA text. It argues that the flaws in the Community Patent proposal are unlikely to be resolved any time soon, but recognises the need for some kind of pan-European approach to patenting generally.

Against that background, the parties call for a legal review of the EPLA and for significant improvements to be made to the text. It also calls for a set of rules of procedure to be included in the proposal.

The FFII has described the proposal as "a compromise that prevents the worst", but you get the sense they would have preferred a more resolute position from the parliament.

The campaigners write: "According to this compromise resolution, the parliament basically supports the EPLA and asks for the EU to 'join the EPC', but calls for 'significant improvements' to the current EPLA text."

The FFII warns that without a concerted effort, even an amended EPLA will raise the costs of most patent lawsuits over the status quo, make patent lawsuits prohibitively expensive for those who publish software on the internet, threaten judicial independence, and pave the way for granting enforceable software patents in Europe.

It urges interested parties to contact their MEP "politely" to find out where they stand on the subject ahead of the vote on 11 and 12 October. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.